Healthier rocky road

Recipes

I love rocky road! I only ever make it at Christmas! One year, I created one with raspberry jubes, marshmallows and roasted/salted peanuts. It was delicious but so sweet. I don’t mind a lolly or two sporadically, especially at Christmas, but these days I prefer my sweet treats to be a little more wholesome.

I like to think that every time I eat, I have an opportunity to nourish my body. I don’t see this philosophy as never eating sugar or cutting out certain foods, I see it from a positive perspective and try to include nutrient rich foods as often as I can.  So when it comes to Christmas and making rocky road for the celebrations, rather than stressing about the chocolate part of this treat, which you really can’t leave out, I fill my rocky road with my favourite whole foods! 

Ingredients

  • Dark chocolate, melted
  • White chocolate, melted
  • Raw almonds
  • Coconut flakes
  • Dried apricots
  • Sunflower seeds
  • Sesame seeds

Method

  • Line a tray with baking paper and evenly spread out the nuts, seeds, coconut and dried fruit.
  • Evenly pour over the melted dark and white chocolate and try to coat as much of the other ingredients as possible.
  • Use a toothpick to draw patterns through the chocolate. Place in the fridge for 30 minutes to set.
  • Break into bite size pieces and serve. They make a nice gift in a pretty paper cup with cellophane and a bow.
This recipe is provided by Kate Freeman
Kate Freeman is HRI's resident nutritionist. Kate Freeman consults, writes, presents and mentors in the field of nutrition and has over 10 years of experience in the industry. 
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