Meet the Team: Professor Paul Pilowsky

Meet the team

Professor Paul Pilowsky came to the HRI in 2013 when he founded the High Blood Pressure Group. The Group has grown considerably and now also includes a large number of students who have contributed to its success.

"The main satisfaction that I achieve in my work is in observing a novel experiment reach its conclusion at the hands of a student who has never experienced science in the past and who then themselves has the pleasure of publishing their work and presenting it to a wider audience," says Paul.

Paul’s research is concerned with brain networks that control airways, breathing and blood pressure.

"Over the past 30 years, my team and I have been investigating how the brain controls blood pressure," he says.

"The pleasure this work gives me remains unchallenged despite the passage of time."

This year the group’s research plans include further understanding why the brain causes blood pressure to increase in disease and in situations that are normal but at the extreme end of the healthy range.

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